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E3 is opening to the public for the first time

E3 is opening to the public for the first time

After a brief public tease last year that amounted to nothing more than some branded tents and a Doritos stage, the country’s premier video game convention will let the public go hands-on with its overwhelming congregation of upcoming video games and virtual reality headsets.

The Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, will open up a limited number of passes to this June’s convention at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Consumer passes will go on sale next Monday, February 13, at noon according to the announcement video below.

Tickets will cost $250, with special $150 early bird passes available on Monday, and provide access to the show floor, panel discussions and other events, according to Gamespot. A total of 15,000 passes will be made available to the public—a sizable chunk considering last year’s attendance number topped out at 50,300. It should also be noted that those consumer passes are considerably cheaper than last year’s $995 professional tickets; additional pricing for 2017 has yet to be announced.

E3 has historically only been for industry professionals—from game journalists to software developers—but last year the convention let 20,000 fans into its first free public-facing event, E3 Live. We found the L.A. Live spinoff’s pint-sized tents were a sideshow compared to the Convention Center’s multisensory overload. This year’s consumer pass, though, should give the general public the same hands-on, trade show experience as industry professionals—swag bags, soul-crushing lines and all.

Conversations swirled around the convention’s relevance last year as major publishers like Electronic Arts, Activision, Sega and Disney all decided to vacate their costly spaces on the L.A. Convention Center show floor. This year’s show floor roster has yet to be released.

E3 2017 takes place June 13 through 15 at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

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Cronut mastermind Dominique Ansel is opening his first restaurant in L.A.

Cronut mastermind Dominique Ansel is opening his first restaurant in L.A.

If there’s any indication that Los Angeles is a mecca for chefs looking to experiment right now, it’s this: Dominique Ansel, inventor of the cult-favorite Cronut, is opening a restaurant in L.A. And yes, he’s bringing the Cronut with him.

The LA Times reports that in late 2017, Ansel will open his fifth—and largest—project, a restaurant that will include brunch, dinner, cocktails and events. The space still hasn’t been nailed down, but it will undoubtedly be popular; at a 2014 pop-up, Angelenos flooded to The Grove for a sample of the chef’s croissant-donut mash-up. Ansel, who opened his first bakery in New York City in 2011, told the Times that he is excited about L.A.’s potential. “People seem more patient; they seem to give you more of a chance to express yourself,” he explained. In addition to his NYC bakery, Ansel’s projects include Dominique Ansel Kitchen (also in NYC), and Dominique Ansel Bakeries in Tokyo and London. 

There will, of course, be a bakery component to the restaurant, where people can pick up the Cronut and other baked goods if they’re not interested in sitting down for a meal. There will certainly be a line, but with the recent arrival of Mr. Holmes Bakehouse and its crowd-inducing Cruffin, we’re getting used to waiting in line for pastries.  

Ansel isn’t the only chef who’s making a triumphant return to L.A.; Scott Conant, who ran the spaghetti-drenched Scarpetta for years, has just signed on to open Ponte, an Italian restaurant in the former Terrine space. Just another reason why L.A. kicks NY’s ass.

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Book Airbnb’s coziest mountain cabins for a dreamy winter getaway

Book Airbnb’s coziest mountain cabins for a dreamy winter getaway

With all the snow that has been falling lately and everything in nature looking so good, we certainly can’t blame you if you feel like the mountains are calling your name. When you’re ready to embrace those hygge winter feelings, the first order of business is booking the perfect cozy cabin. Whether you’re looking for a romantic Valentine’s Day getaway or are planning to get a whole group of friends together for a weekend of skiing and hiking, the perfect cabin is waiting for you. Now all you have to do is light a fire and curl up with a good book.

Mid-Century Mountain Chalet, Mammoth Lakes, $299

Larks Nest, Big Bear Lake, $278

The Lake House at Lake Arrowhead, Lake Arrowhead, $195

Basecamp Cabin, Big Bear Lake, $150

The Ponderosa, Wrightwood, $168

Spruce Hollow, Big Bear Lake, $99

 Treetop Tranquility Cabin, Big Bear Lake, $225

Vintage Charmer Home, Lake Arrowhead, $150

California Modern Cabin, Big Bear Lake, $150

 

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After 80 years at the Original Farmers Market, Gill’s Ice Cream Parlor closes up shop

After 80 years at the Original Farmers Market, Gill’s Ice Cream Parlor closes up shop

There are a number of reasons why today is probably difficult for some people, but the announcement that Gill’s Ice Cream Parlor is closing puts the proverbial cherry on top.

Los Angeles Magazine brings word that the 80-year-old ice cream shop, owned by Jody Gill, will be serving its last scoop of soft serve on February 2. So what brings about the impending closure? It’s not a raise in rent prices, but a cosmetic demand—the Original Farmers Market has asked Gill’s to get rid of its retro vibe and instead update the façade with a more modern decor. Jody’s father, Bob Gill, was the original owner and responsible for the parlor’s funky, whimsical design; after choosing not to comply with the market’s request, the family-owned business has decided to close instead. 

The article goes on to mention that another old-fashioned ice cream shop will be moving into Gill’s place. But we’ll miss this 80-year-old staple—one of the Market’s very first vendors—and are rooting for its comeback elsewhere. It’s an important reminder that we, as diners and consumers, need to continue frequenting our favorite restaurants, ice cream parlors, coffee shops and bars—that checking out the newest eatery is fun, but supporting our go-to spots is just as important.

In the meantime, you can check out some of L.A.’s other venerable ice cream shops, and hope for a Gill’s reopening in the future. 

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